The Invention of Science: The Scientific Revolution from 1500 to 1750

The Invention of Science: The Scientific Revolution from 1500 to 1750

A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder, A Clockwork Universe, and Darwin’s Ghosts—a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history, the Scientific Revolution, and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our world.

We live in a world transformed by scientific discovery. Yet today, science and its practitioners have come under political attack. In this fascinating history spanning continents and centuries, historian David Wootton offers a lively defense of science, revealing why the Scientific Revolution was truly the greatest event in our history.

The Invention of Science goes back five hundred years in time to chronicle this crucial transformation, exploring the factors that led to its birth and the people who made it happen. Wootton argues that the Scientific Revolution was actually five separate yet concurrent events that developed independently, but came to intersect and create a new worldview. Here are the brilliant iconoclasts—Galileo, Copernicus, Brahe, Newton, and many more curious minds from across Europe—whose studies of the natural world challenged centuries of religious orthodoxy and ingrained superstition.

From gunpowder technology, the discovery of the new world, movable type printing, perspective painting, and the telescope to the practice of conducting experiments, the laws of nature, and the concept of the fact, Wotton shows how these discoveries codified into a social construct and a system of knowledge. Ultimately, he makes clear the link between scientific discovery and the rise of industrialization—and the birth of the modern world we know.

Title:The Invention of Science: The Scientific Revolution from 1500 to 1750
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780061759529
Format Type:

    The Invention of Science: The Scientific Revolution from 1500 to 1750 Reviews

  • Mark Hebwood

    I was so looking forward to liking this book. But in the end, I did not really warm to it. I do not say this lightly, and it even takes me some courage to admit it. Why so? Because the history of idea...

  • Warwick

    This is a book with a simple argument to make: that the scientific revolution was a real thing, it definitely happened, and it happened at a specific point in time, namely, ‘between 1572, when Tycho...

  • Liviu

    another book I read across time and finished the last few pages in these two free days after the New Year - dense, requiring effort (both to understand the prose occasionally and to understand the arg...

  • Steven Peck

    Simply one of the best treatments of the history and philosophy of science I've read. An exploration of how science developed, what tools and cultural conditions made it possible, and how and why it h...

  • Peter Mcloughlin

    This book defends the traditional idea of the scientific revolution as a break in Western history that so radical that it introduced the idea of progress, disenchanted the world , created a worldview ...

  • Jim Coughenour

    This book will look, I trust, realist to relativists and relativist to realists: that is how it is meant to look.The Invention of Science isn't an easy book to read. Neither is it particularly difficu...

  • Subeyr Bashir

    The author did a good job by laying out the historic events that make The Scientific Revolution possible. He did detailed language evolution of what he called 'intellectual tools' of modern science fo...

  • Brian Clegg

    This is no lightweight book - both literally and metaphorically. It packs in nearly 600 pages of decidedly small print, and manages to assign about 10 per cent of these simply to deciding what is mean...

  • Louise

    HIGHLY recommended for science nerds!This is a sweeping summary, very well sourced and noted, of the basic idea + repercussions of the Scientific Revolution. Here's the whole glorious thing summarized...

  • Cindy G.

    I am not really qualified to critique the content of this book, but I will comment for other readers like me who enjoy history of science as amateurs. This is clearly a scholarly work, however I only ...