The Confusion, Part I

The Confusion, Part I

In this compelling adventure, Stephenson brings to life a cast of unforgettable characters in the late 1600s on the high seas. It is a time of breathtaking genius and discovery for men and women whose exploits define an age known as Baroque....

Title:The Confusion, Part I
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780060833220
Format Type:

    The Confusion, Part I Reviews

  • Bradley

    Now, I admit to being a huge fanboy of Stephenson in general, but unfortunately, I wasn't horribly thrilled about this book.That's not to say that it didn't have some really fascinating bits and seque...

  • Gustav Tonér

    Sometimes slow and wordy but the parts which are not more than makes up for it with its brilliance and humor....

  • Bradley McCann

    The Baroque Cycle is a difficult one to rate because it intersperses periods of great boredom with sections that are really quite fun (usually with 'half-cocked' Jack). Deep into this part of the saga...

  • Navaneethan Santhanam

    By far, this has been the best book of the series so far. It goes all over the place - from Algiers to Spain to Cairo to India and then to Japan and Mexico. The exploits of the Cabal are outstanding a...

  • Piotr Petelski

    Neal Stephenson jak zwykle trzyma poziom - tym razem dostajemy opis dwóch na pierwszy rzut oka ze sobą niepowiązanych XVII-wiecznych przekrętów na skalę światową, obejmujących swoim zasięgie...

  • Halle Lieu

    “Very good then,” said Surendranath, “You have shown extreme wisdom in establishing your batna.”“Avast! We are all People of the Book here, and have no use for your idolatrous claptrap,” s...

  • Brian

    Like Cryptonomicon, but set in England around the time of Newton and Leibniz. Not quite as succinctly thrilling as Cryptonomicon, but like turned to love when I recently re-read it. Information, algor...

  • Joe Labriola

    "Bonanza" is perhaps the most entertaining entry into Neal Stephenson's "The Baroque Cycle" series, featuring the return of none other than Jack Shaftoe as the King of the Vagabonds journeys far and w...

  • Kate Sherrod

    Oh thank BOG there's a competent, nay, glorious, voice actress to narrate all of Eliza's epistolary bits. Now, shorn, mostly, of male fantasizing/sexualizing of her, she emerges as someone to admire a...

  • Raykoda1 .

    My favourite part of this book is how people non ironically use the phrase "Behold!" in normal conversation. That should make a comeback....