A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution

A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution

A trailblazing biologist grapples with her role in the biggest scientific discovery of our era: a cheap, easy way of rewriting genetic code, with nearly limitless promise and peril.

Not since the atomic bomb has a technology so alarmed its inventors that they warned the world about its use. Not, that is, until the spring of 2015, when biologist Jennifer Doudna called for a worldwide moratorium on the use of the new gene-editing tool CRISPR—a revolutionary new technology that she helped create—to make heritable changes in human embryos. The cheapest, simplest, most effective way of manipulating DNA ever known, CRISPR may well give us the cure to HIV, genetic diseases, and some cancers, and will help address the world’s hunger crisis. Yet even the tiniest changes to DNA could have myriad, unforeseeable consequences—to say nothing of the ethical and societal repercussions of intentionally mutating embryos to create “better” humans.
 
Writing with fellow researcher Samuel Sternberg, Doudna shares the thrilling story of her discovery, and passionately argues that enormous responsibility comes with the ability to rewrite the code of life. With CRISPR, she shows, we have effectively taken control of evolution. What will we do with this unfathomable power?
 

Title:A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780544716940
Format Type:

    A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution Reviews

  • Clif Hostetler

    This book's coauthor, Jennifer Doudna, together with Emmanuelle Charpentier published a seminal 2012 paper that demonstrated that CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) cou...

  • David

    This is a wonderful book, written by the scientist who discovered that the CRISPR reaction could be applied as a powerful gene-editing tool. In the first half of the book, Jennifer Doudna writes a pow...

  • Max

    On October 22nd 2019 an article ran in The Guardian announcing the first birthdays of twin girls. What made them special is that they are the first humans to be born from gene edited embryos, the firs...

  • Andrej Karpathy

    Very similar to Watson's "The Double Helix", this book is a part story of discovery and part a textbook, in this case on the topic of CRISPR, from a scientist deeply and technically involved in the te...

  • Adeyemi Ajao

    Last time a book gave me this feeling of awe and amazement was reading Stephen Hawkin's "Brief history of time" 20 years ago. It speaks volumes to Jennifer's ability to distilled the essential on this...

  • Bria

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway! Definitely a subject I'd be interested in but maybe I wouldn't have pursued it otherwise, so thanks Goodreads.Me being me, I found myself turned off by the per...

  • Rachel (Kalanadi)

    A great explanation of CRISPR Cas9 that recounts the research that uncovered it and makes a case for determining how we will responsibly control and wield this powerful tool in future gene editing. Th...

  • R Nair

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content...This was the ground breaking paper (not sure if I should post the link to the full article here) published by the authors of this book along with other research...

  • Charlene

    I found this book equally informative and annoying. So much GREAT information. Crispr is nothing short of miraculous. Have you ever studied viruses or plasmids and been amazed at how a virus knows how...

  • Andrew

    Pretty dry and hyper-technical (or at least poorly explained) re: the details surrounding the CRISPR discovery and how CRISPR works: I learned much, much more from Siddhartha Mukherjee’s “The Gene...