Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids

Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids

Award-winning journalist Vivian Ho exposes a shattering true-crime story, shedding light on America’s new lost generation.

In 2015, the senseless Bay Area murders of twenty-three-year-old Audrey Carey and sixty-seven-year-old Steve Carter were personal tragedies for the victims’ families. But they also shed light on a more complex issue. The killers were three drifters scrounging for a living among a burgeoning counterculture population. Soon this community of runaways and transients became vulnerable scapegoats of a modern witch hunt. The supposedly progressive residents of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, only two generations removed from the Summer of Love, now feared all of society’s outcasts as threats.

In Those Who Wander, Vivian Ho delves deep into a rising subculture that’s changing the very fabric of her city and all of urban America. Moving beyond the disheartening statistics, she gives voices to these young people—victims of abuse, failed foster care, mental illness, and drug addiction. She also doesn’t ignore the threat they pose to themselves and to others as a dangerous dark side emerges. With alarming urgency, she asks what can be done to save the next generation of America’s vagabond youth.

Title:Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781503903739
Format Type:

    Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids Reviews

  • Whistlers Mom

    As the author admits, there's much "information" in this book that can never be verified. So let's start with what can be. In October, 2015, three young people murdered and robbed 23-year-old Audrey C...

  • Dee Arr

    Although the book relates the stories of Lila Scott Alligood, Morrison Haze Lampley, and Sean Michael Angold, author Vivian Ho uses their experiences as a jumping-off point to offer a look at a seriou...

  • MM Suarez

    A well done book on a very important subject. If this human tragedy touches you and you are able to help, check out covenanthouse.org in the US, Canada or Latin America, to help save the ones we can...

  • Jon

    Part true crime, part exploration of homelessness. Vivian Ho documents the murders of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter at the hands of three "street kids" in San Francisco. Remove references and the extr...

  • Cami

    I read this in an afternoon. Absolutely incredible. The writing and reporting are excellent, and the stories are haunting. Highly recommended to foster parents, social workers, teachers, or anyone who...

  • MBP

    It's a tragic story: three troubled homeless kids find each other and then, fueled by drugs, commit two murders together. I thought this was both overwritten, especially in the first half, and underin...

  • Tammie

    Just ok. Expected moreFor 200 pages there wasn't enough 'meat' to this book. What I found most annoying was that it was so repetitive. Ho mentions the same facts and details over and over again as if ...

  • Stacy Jones

    Not about what it saysThis book is almost solely focused on a murder. It then makes attempts to connect the fact that the murderers where street kids to make a statement about street kids for about th...

  • Jessica Frey

    DNF at ~15%. Not interested in feeling empathy for murderers. ...

  • Julie Baker

    The hard and painful truth of youth homelessnessHo portrayed first-hand, raw experiences with west coast homeless youths and the entire counterculture around "houselessness". It's not only heartbreaki...