Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals

Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals

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The average human lifespan is absurdly, insultingly brief. Assuming you live to be eighty, you have just over four thousand weeks.

Nobody needs telling there isn’t enough time. We’re obsessed with our lengthening to-do lists, our overfilled inboxes, work-life balance, and the ceaseless battle against distraction; and we’re deluged with advice on becoming more productive and efficient, and “life hacks” to optimize our days. But such techniques often end up making things worse. The sense of anxious hurry grows more intense, and still the most meaningful parts of life seem to lie just beyond the horizon. Still, we rarely make the connection between our daily struggles with time and the ultimate time management problem: the challenge of how best to use our four thousand weeks.

Drawing on the insights of both ancient and contemporary philosophers, psychologists, and spiritual teachers, Oliver Burkeman delivers an entertaining, humorous, practical, and ultimately profound guide to time and time management. Rejecting the futile modern fixation on “getting everything done,” Four Thousand Weeks introduces readers to tools for constructing a meaningful life by embracing finitude, showing how many of the unhelpful ways we’ve come to think about time aren’t inescapable, unchanging truths, but choices we’ve made as individuals and as a society—and that we could do things differently.

Title:Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780374159122
Format Type:

    Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals Reviews

  • Ryan Boissonneault

    First of all, this is probably not the book you think it is, and that’s a good thing. Rather than offering cheap “time hacks” to get more of the same bullshit done, this more philosophical work ...

  • Sara G

    Oliver Burkeman call himself a productivity geek. As he describes it, “you know how some people are passionate about bodybuilding or fashion, or rock climbing, or poetry? Productivity geeks are pass...

  • Matthew

    Thanks to Farrar, Straus and Giroux and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book. I loved it so much I have bought a copy, and plan to give more as gifts!I’ve been a fan of Burkeman’s since his ...

  • Jennifer Louden

    while Oliver doesn't say anything you probably already don't know, he says it in a way that could change your life. I loved this book so much I invited Oliver to be on my podcast as the first male gue...

  • Shelley

    I identified with this author's addiction to productivity and appreciate his attempts to cultivate a more stoic attitude toward time. He wisely encourages us to embrace our finitude and to relinquish ...

  • Victoria

    The reality and philosophy of our limited time and its management. It is a quick but deep read. I listened to the audio version narrated by the author. My favorite section was his insights regarding t...

  • Rachel Grey

    I read this last week and have already given it as a gift once, it's that good. I very much enjoyed the notion that since there are more A-list, important, meaningful, top-rated things that we might l...

  • Alicia Bayer

    I am one of those people who constantly tries to manage my time better. I love lists, apps, charts and books that promise to help me become the kind of person who accomplishes far more. I constantly b...

  • Marija S.

    I firmly believe that a clock may be the most dangerous invention humankind has stumbled upon and that we are caught in a rat race of our perception of time as a resource. This book spoke to me in a w...

  • David Pulliam

    1. Could have been condensed into an article2. Just read Ecclesiastes or a stoic and you’ll get the point3. Had one good point: embrace what you’re doing and acknowledge that you won’t be able t...