Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World

Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World

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More than 31 million people in the UK are gamers. The average young person in the UK will spend 10,000 hours gaming by the age of twenty-one. What's causing this mass exodus? According to world-renowned game designer Jane McGonigal the answer is simple: videogames are fulfilling genuine human needs. Drawing on positive psychology, cognitive science and sociology, Reality is Broken shows how game designers have hit on core truths about what makes us happy, and utilized these discoveries to astonishing effect in virtual environments. But why, McGonigal asks, should we use the power of games for escapist entertainment alone? In this groundbreaking exploration of the power and future of gaming, she reveals how gamers have become expert problem solvers and collaborators, and shows how we can use the lessons of game design to socially positive ends, be it in our own lives, our communities or our businesses. Written for gamers and non-gamers alike, Reality is Broken sends a clear and provocative message: the future will belong to those who can understand, design and play games.

Title:Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780224089258
Format Type:

    Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World Reviews

  • MJ Nicholls

    I’m in two minds about this ambitious beast. On the one hand, the author is clearly bonkers and operating on an epic bandwidth of partial megalomania. On the other hand, her enthusiasm and spirit of...

  • Adam

    Jane McGonnigal has become a figurehead for what has become known as the "gamification" movement. This movement posits that elements of game design should be incorporated into real life. The premise i...

  • Kressel Housman

    As I said in my review of Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Violent Video Games and What Parents Can Do , my oldest son is a computer game addict, but my second son has a different ...

  • Barb Middleton

    I"m not a gamer, but I am a player of games from sports to board games to game-format lessons for students. Games are fun. Games are motivating. Games in cultures are thousands of years old. This book...

  • William Thomas

    This author is an anarchist and doesn't even know it. She's a populist and doesn't even know it. And she's very close to being bat-shit crazy, but gets a pass because of her mention of Herodotus. You ...

  • Owen

    I kept reading this book hoping McGonigal would turn out to have written something else. It's all about how and why structured games are so compelling and powerful that we can (and should) use them to...

  • Emma Sea

    Western upper-middle-class privilege overflows from this book, dark brown and sludgy. Replacing social services for elders with untrained and unregulated volunteer labor in it for the virtual currency...

  • Julie

    I find all the negative reviews that are listed for this book to be relatively amusing. It seems glaringly obvious from those who are providing these reviews that they are not part of the 176 million ...

  • Chip Huyen

    The first half of the book is amazing. I learned a lot about what made a game good, what we can learn from that to make real life work more exciting, what game developers know about engineering happin...

  • Michael Burnam-Fink

    Reality is certainly broken. Leave aside the big problems like climate change, peak oil, political instability, and economic collapse, on a day to day basis, people are feeling alienated from their jo...