Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human

Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human

Acclaimed author Matt Ridley's thrilling follow-up to his bestseller Genome. Armed with the extraordinary new discoveries about our genes, Ridley turns his attention to the nature versus nurture debate to bring the first popular account of the roots of human behaviour. What makes us who we are?In February 2001 it was announced that the genome contains not 100,000 genes as originally expected but only 30,000. This startling revision led some scientists to conclude that there are simply not enough human genes to account for all the different ways people behave: we must be made by nurture, not nature. Matt Ridley argues that the emerging truth is far more interesting than this myth. Nurture depends on genes, too, and genes need nurture. Genes not only predetermine the broad structure of the brain; they also absorb formative experiences, react to social cues and even run memory. after the discovery of the double helix of DNA, Nature via Nurture chronicles a new revolution in our understanding of genes. Ridley recounts the hundred years' war between the partisans of nature and nurture to explain how this paradoxical creature, the human being, can be simultaneously free-willed and motivated by instinct and culture. Nature via Nurture is an enthralling, up-to-the-minute account of how genes build brains to absorb experience.

Title:Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781841157467
Format Type:

    Nature Via Nurture: Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human Reviews

  • Seán Hudson

    I feel bad giving this book a rating, since it has been one of those rare ones that I decided to stop reading despite having only managed a few chapters. I did skim through a fair bit of the rest, and...

  • Soren Maleficus

    My other favorite writer, next to Pinker. Ridley sets out to tear down the wall that has divided the "Nature vs Nurture" debate for centuries. Readable (as always from Ridley) and engrossing, this exp...

  • Sarah

    Nicely written examination of a subject which everyone should understand. He does his best to put the "nature vs nuture" debate to rest. Informative without being dry....

  • Jurij Fedorov

    A really good book.Pro:I takes a centrist view on things. It is basically science with no personal views or observations. This is the middle ground in the nature-nurture debate. Well written and short...

  • Jennifer

    While I agree with the central theme of the book, the author struggles to find the balance between an academic publication and a book for the general public. This book assumes knowledge of psychology,...

  • Joel

    This book is along the same lines as Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters. The best thing I can do to review these two books together is list what I think their pros and cons are:Pros...

  • Nancy Mills

    Very well written and thorough, pleasantly accessible to the layman. Much of this material was familiar to me, but I read a lot about this topic. Nevertheless enjoyed it greatly, I really like Matt Ri...

  • Gerald Berke

    A detailed, readable and witty treatise on how life is controlled by genes (nature) and how life controls genes (nurture). The research, the ideas, the roots of various theories of understanding from ...

  • Astha Garg

    This was my first science book that I read for leisure and I must say it has got me hooked on the genre. I loved Ridley's style - the humor, logic, experiments and his own thoughts. I wish there were ...

  • Annie

    Quick review before I'm off to bed. Ridley’s work is a relatively good primer to classic psychology studies vis-a-vis the nature-nurture debate. Criticizing human exceptionalism, that humans differ ...